News & Events

Check this section for Yukon Energy's latest news and coming events.

If you have questions about any of the information posted here, please contact:

Stephanie Cunha
Manager, Communications
Yukon Energy Corporation
Phone: (867) 393-5333
Email: Stephanie.Cunha@yec.yk.ca

News, Media Releases, Environment
May 13, 2021  Comment

May update: Peak water level forecast for Marsh Lake and other hydro basins

Lots of rain last summer and heavy snowfall this winter has resulted in high snowpack levels in each of the watersheds that feed our reservoirs. what high snowpack means for water levels On their own, snowpack levels don’t paint the full picture of how much water will flow into lakes year to year. Rain and glacier melt play important roles too. So does the timing of each of these inflows and the natural limits of how much water can pass through a hydro dam. forecasted summer peak water levels Marsh Lake – 656.78 m Forecast: Above Full Supply. 4 cm lower than the peak water level forecasted in March 2021. 56 cm lower than peak water levels during the 2007 flood. Comparable to peak water levels in 2004. Mayo Lake – 665.84 m Forecast: At Full Supply. Aishihik Lake – 915.16 m Forecast: At Full Supply what we have done to draw down Marsh Lake Since March, our inflow model has forecasted that water levels on Marsh Lake will be higher than normal this summer. Because of that, we have taken the following steps to increase flows through the Whitehorse Rapids Generating Station and to lower levels on Marsh Lake: Opened up the gates at the Lewes River Control Structure. All 30 gates at the Lewes River Control Structure have been open since March 19, 2021. Gradually lowered water levels on Schwatka Lake by 95 cm to increase water flows through Miles Canyon. Our water use licence only allows us to lower Schwatka Lake by 1 m. Opened the boat lock at the Lewes River Control Structure. Since March 1, 2021, we have drawn down Marsh Lake by more than 1.25 metres, and to levels comparable to this time last time. Our inflow model suggests that water from the spring melt (also known as freshet) started to enter Marsh Lake around May 7 this year, about two weeks earlier than normal.  Our actions so far have helped to limit how much Marsh Lake has risen since freshet, but residents in the Southern Lakes area can expect to see water levels slowly start to rise again in the coming weeks. changes this summer Throughout the summer, we’ll continue to do what we can to keep flows through the Whitehorse dam high and levels on Marsh Lake as low as possible. The boat lock will remain open this summer. Small watercraft wanting to pass by the Lewes River Control Structure will need to portage around the structure. Lake levels on Schwatka Lake will also remain at reduced levels throughout the summer. Some docks may need to be lowered to allow users to access floatplanes on the lake. update on our water use licence On April 28, 2021, the Yukon Water Board approved our application for an emergency amendment to our Whitehorse Rapids Generating Station water use licence. The amendment allows us to draw down Marsh Lake 10 cm below the permitted Low Supply Level this year, with conditions that we monitor and report back on how the environment responded to the lower lake level. Unfortunately, because of the early freshet and with water from the spring melt already entering Marsh Lake, it’s unlikely that we will be able to reach this new reduced level this spring. looking ahead Over the next several months, we’ll keep a close eye on lake levels on Marsh Lake and downstream of the dam. We will also continue to work with Yukon government’s Water Resources Branch and Emergency Measures Organization (EMO) to assess water levels and to share information with the public.

News, Energy Supply, Environment
Apr 15, 2021  Comment

April update: Peak water level forecast for Marsh Lake and other hydro basins

HYDRO PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN YUKON’S ELECTRICITY MIX.  In 2021, we expect to use water to generate about 94% of the electricity needed by Yukoners connected to the grid.  We own and operate three hydroelectric generation facilities in the territory – one in Whitehorse, one in Mayo and one in Aishihik. Lots of rain last summer and heavy snowfall this winter has resulted in high snowpack levels in each of these areas near our hydro reservoirs.  what high snowpack levels mean for water levels  On their own, snowpack levels don’t paint the full picture of how much water will flow into lakes this year. Three sources of water contribute to reservoir inflows and water levels:  Snowpack Rain Glacier melt (for Whitehorse only; not Aishihik or Mayo) The timing of each of these inflows also plays an important part in determining water levels, as does the natural limits to the amount of water that can flow into a hydro dam (i.e., Miles Canyon).  April 2021 snowpack levels forecasted summer peak water levels  Marsh Lake – 656.79 m  Forecast: Above Full Supply.  Assumes a wet spring.  Assumes we receive approval from the Yukon Water Board to draw down Marsh Lake 10 cm lower than its permitted Low Supply Level.  3 cm lower than the peak water level forecasted in March 2021.  55 cm lower than peak water levels during the 2007 flood.  Mayo Lake – 665.84 m  Forecast: At Full Supply.  Aishihik Lake – 914.82 m  Forecast: Below Full Supply.  what we have done, and continue to do, to drawn down Marsh Lake Every spring, we make room in Marsh Lake for rain and spring melt by lowering water levels on the lake close to its Low Supply Level (653.796 m) – the lowest level allowed under our water use licence.  This spring, because of high snowpack levels in the area, we have taken the following steps to increase flows through the Whitehorse dam and to lower levels on Marsh Lake:  Opened up the gates at the Lewes River Control Structure. All 30 gates have been open since March 19, 2021.  Lowered water levels on Schwatka Lake by 40 cm.  Submitted an emergency amendment to our Whitehorse Rapids Generating Station water use licence to the Yukon Water Board on April 1, 2021. The Yukon Water Board is currently deliberating our request.  To date, we’ve had success in lowering water levels on Marsh Lake. Between March 1, 2021 and April 15, 2021, levels on Marsh Lake have dropped 91 cm. Conditions downstream of the Whitehorse dam have also remained typical of this time of year.  Over the next several months, we’ll continue to keep a close eye on lake levels on Marsh Lake and downstream of the dam. As conditions change and our inflow forecasts become clearer, we’ll look at which additional options exist within our control to draw down lake levels even further, if needed. We will always keep the potential effects to the Southern Lakes, to neighbourhoods downstream of the dam, and to the land and environment top of mind. 

News, Safety
Mar 31, 2021  Comment

Yukoners asked to avoid going on the ice on Schwatka Lake

Ice breaks and fast-flowing water possible as Yukon Energy continues to lower Marsh Lake levels. Yukon Energy is asking Yukoners to avoid going on the ice on Schwatka Lake starting today. Water levels on Schwatka Lake will fall over the next week as Yukon Energy continues to increase the amount of water flowing through Miles Canyon and the Whitehorse dam, in an effort to lower water levels on Marsh Lake. Yukoners are being warned that lower water levels on Schwatka Lake may cause ice along the lake’s shorelines to break and for there to be unpredictable ice conditions. Water flowing under the ice surface is also likely to move faster than before. Yukon Energy started increasing flows at the Whitehorse dam earlier this month after Yukon government’s March 2021 Snow Survey Bulletin highlighted snowpack levels in the Southern Lakes region to be 172% of normal. At the time, Yukon Energy also forecasted that in case of a wet spring, water levels on Marsh Lake could peak at 656.82 m – similar levels to those reached in 2004, but 52 cm below water levels reached during the 2007 flood. On March 19th, Yukon Energy opened all 30 gates at the Lewes River Control as an initial measure to lower levels on Marsh Lake. As of 8:00 this morning, Marsh Lake levels were at 654.61 metres above sea level and 60 centimetres lower than lake levels on March 1, 2021*. Every spring, Yukon Energy draws down lake levels on Marsh Lake by generating hydroelectricity at the Whitehorse dam. This makes room in the lake for rain and spring melt. Water levels in Marsh Lake typically reach their lowest level in late May when they fall to around the Low Supply Level of 653.796 m – the lowest level allowed under Yukon Energy’s current water use licence. This spring, because of high snowpack levels, Yukon Energy plans to apply for an emergency amendment to its water license to draw Marsh Lake levels down 10 cm lower than the existing low supply level. Yukon government will release their next Snow Survey Bulletin in April. Yukon Energy will provide an updated peak water level forecast for Marsh Lake shortly thereafter. *Corrected. A previous version stated March 1, 2020. Media contact: Megan Yakiwchuk Corporate Secretary Yukon Energy 393-5337 megan.yakiwchuk@yec.yk.ca

Mar 17, 2021  Comment

New Mayo to McQuesten Transmission Line Energized

The new transmission line between Mayo and the McQuesten substation was energized earlier this week marking the completion of the first stage of the Mayo to McQuesten Transmission Line Replacement project. The project will improve power quality and increase reliability in the Mayo and Keno areas, improve public safety, and support future growth and development in the region with more renewable electricity. The Mayo to McQuesten Transmission Line Replacement project takes place on the Traditional Territories of the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyäk Dun and Selkirk First Nation. It consists of two major stages: building a new 31 kilometre, 138 kilovolt transmission line to replace a 65-year-old transmission line that had reached end-of-life; and adding system protection equipment at the Stewart Crossing South substation to improve power quality in central Yukon. On September 5, 2019, the Government of Canada announced a contribution of over $22.7 million towards the project through the Green Infrastructure Stream (GIS) of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. Construction of the Mayo to McQuesten Transmission Line Replacement project began in June 2020 after strict COVID-19 safety plans were put in place to keep area residents, First Nations Citizens and contractors safe. No cases of COVID-19 have been reported on the project to date. More than 50 First Nations and non-First Nations companies in Yukon have worked on or provided services for the Mayo to McQuesten Transmission Line Replacement project since project planning and engineering began in 2015. An estimated $6.2 million has been spent locally on surveying, geotechnical, engineering, site clearing, road construction and power line construction work, and other services such as accommodation and meal services. Work on stage 2 of the project will continue over the next several months. This spring, the original 65-year-old transmission line will be removed from the powerline right-of-way and work will continue at the Stewart Crossing South substation. Upgrades at the substation are expected to be complete by the end of this year. Quotes: “At Yukon Energy, it’s our job to generate and deliver electricity to communities across much of Yukon.  An important part of this work is upgrading and replacing aging equipment, and making sure our electrical system is able to support a growing economy and demands for power. Our work on the Mayo to McQuesten Transmission Line Replacement project is not done, but it’s off to an excellent start and we’re committed to finishing it by the end of this year and on-budget.” Andrew Hall, President & CEO, Yukon Energy Quick Facts: Together, both stages of the Mayo to McQuesten Transmission Line Replacement project are expected to cost $34 million. Yukon Development Corporation provided $3.5 million towards planning costs (formerly the Stewart to Keno City Rehabilitation Project). On September 5, 2019, the Government of Canada announced its contribution of over $22.7 million towards the replacement of the Mayo to McQuesten transmission line through the Green Infrastructure Stream (GIS) of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. Yukon Energy is investing $7.8 million in the project. Industrial customers that use the new transmission line will pay 85 per cent of the fixed annual costs of the line. Contacts: Stephanie Cunha Manager, Communications and Customer Service Yukon Energy 867-393-5333 stephanie.cunha@yec.yk.ca

News, Energy Supply
Mar 12, 2021  Comment

A wet summer plus lots of snow equals more renewable electricity in 2021

Our 2021 Renewable electricity forecast Hydro plays a key role in Yukon’s electricity mix. After lots of rain last summer and heavy snowfall this winter, we expect more water to be available to generate renewable electricity this year. In 2021, we expect to use water to generate about 94% of the electricity needed by Yukoners connected to the grid. The remaining 6% will be produced using liquefied natural gas, primarily, as well as a small amount of diesel. What high snowpack levels mean for the Southern Lakes Yukon's Southern Lakes supply the water we use to generate hydro power at our Whitehorse Rapids Generating Station. Yukon government's March 2021 Snow Survey Bulletin indicates that snowpack in the Southern Lakes watershed is on, average, 172% of normal this winter. On their own, snowpack levels don’t paint the full picture of how much water will flow into the Southern Lakes this year. Three sources of water contribute to reservoir inflows and water levels in the Southern Lakes – snowpack, rain and glacier melt. The timing of each of these inflows also plays an important part in determining water levels. For example, heavy rain over a few days can cause a rapid increase to a lake’s water levels. On the other hand, light rain spread out over several months might have little effect. Right now, we can’t say for certain how high the water levels on Southern Lakes will get this year. A lot will depend on the amount of rain we get and when this rain falls. There are also limits to the amount of water that can naturally flow through Miles Canyon on any given day. Based on the information we have today, if we have a wet spring, our inflow models predict that Marsh Lake water levels this summer could peak at 656.82 m. This is comparable to levels reached in 2004 and about 52 cm below levels reached during the 2007 flood. What we’re doing to prepare Every spring, we make room in Marsh Lake for rain and spring melt by lowering water levels on the lake close to its Low Supply Level (653.796 m) – the lowest level allowed under our water use licence. This spring, because of high snowpack levels in the area, we’re looking at ways to draw Marsh Lake water levels down even lower, to 10 cm below the current Low Supply Level. In order to prepare, we are: Opening gates at the Lewes River Control Structure to increase water inflows to the Whitehorse dam. This will happen over the course of several weeks so we can closely monitor the downstream effects of the additional water flow. Offering secondary sales to SCADA-connected customers at specific times of the day when there’s more water available than what is needed to generate electricity. Spilling water at the Whitehorse dam, if necessary, to maintain increased flows through the dam. Starting our application for an emergency amendment to our Whitehorse Rapids Generating Station water use licence. This is needed to allow us to draw down Marsh Lake 10 cm below the Low Supply Level. And this is just the start. Over the next several months, we’ll keep a close eye on lake levels on Marsh Lake and downstream of the dam. We’ll also continue to refine our forecasts as additional snow pack data and rain forecasts are made available. We will share our results with Yukon government’s Water Resources branch and Emergency Measures Organization (EMO), and the public. We’ll also adapt as needed. As conditions change and our inflow forecasts become more clear, we’ll look at what additional options exist within our control to draw down lake levels even further, if needed – always keeping top-of-mind the potential effects to the Southern Lakes, to neighbourhoods downstream of the dam, and to the land and environment.

Feb 25, 2021  Comment

Atlin Hydro Expansion project advances with funding and First Nations support

The proposed Atlin Hydro Expansion project is several steps closer to development after a number of critical milestones were reached by Tlingit Homeland Energy Limited Partnership (THELP) and Yukon Energy in the last several months. When complete, the Atlin Hydro Expansion project will increase the amount of dependable renewable hydroelectricity available in Yukon. In August 2020, THELP and Yukon Energy signed an Agreement in Principle outlining both parties commitment to work collaboratively to advance the project and negotiate an Electricity Purchase Agreement for the project. Since then, THELP has secured $2.5 million in federal funding to complete preliminary design and engineering for the project. THELP and Yukon Energy continue to work collaboratively to seek additional government grant funding for construction of the project. On December 23, 2020, the Taku River Tlingit First Nation (TRTFN) issued a clan directive outlining that, subject to successful permitting approval by the BC and TRTFN environmental review processes, TRTFN supports the Atlin Hydro Expansion project advancing to financing, construction and operation. In follow-up, in January of this year, THELP submitted environmental permitting applications to BC authorities for the planned expansion of its Atlin facilities. THELP has also submitted permitting applications to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board for the project’s transmission connection to Jakes Corner in Yukon. Today, THELP and Yukon Energy continue to negotiate an Electricity Purchase Agreement which will outline the price Yukon Energy will pay THELP for the electricity generated and additional capacity made available by the planned project. Both parties aim to have an agreement in place this spring. Quotes: “TRTFN began operating its first hydro project in 2009. For over a decade, it has shut down polluting diesel generation and provided clean energy to Sunny Atlin. As our community moves toward clean energy, citizens in our homeland have also made personal decisions and investments to move from oil fired furnaces to utilize this clean energy to heat their homes. Our first project was a small step towards reconciling our collective history and this expansion project will be another significant step in that direction. Socially, culturally, and economically we are Yukoners and so we are honoured to be able to share our resources to provide a cleaner energy future for Yukoners and a brighter future for our citizens and all Atlinites.” Peter Kirby, President & CEO, Taku Group of Companies “Purchasing power from the planned Atlin Hydro Expansion project is another way that Yukon Energy is working hard to make more renewable electricity available to Yukoners and to reduce our reliance on diesel in the near future. This project is also special because of the opportunity it provides us to work directly with yet another First Nation government and development corporation to build the clean energy future that Yukoners need and want.” Andrew Hall, President & CEO, Yukon Energy “The Government of Yukon is pleased to support this partnership between Yukon Energy and the Tlingit Homeland Energy Limited Partnership. The Atlin Hydro Expansion project will address Yukon’s growing demand for energy and help us meet the 97 percent renewable electricity goal in Our Clean Future, our government’s climate change, energy and green economy strategy for the territory. Collaborating with First Nations to expand renewable energy capacity will create economic opportunities and keep our economy strong and resilient.” Ranj Pillai, Minister responsible for the Yukon Energy Corporation Quick Facts: The proposed Atlin Hydro Expansion project would expand the infrastructure and power production capacity on Pine Creek from 2.1 megawatts to approximately 10 megawatts. The additional energy generated would be exported entirely to Yukon to increase the territory’s supply of renewable electricity and dependable capacity when it is needed most, in the winter. The project is expected to add 8.5 megawatts of dependable capacity to Yukon’s grid. That’s about the same as increasing the size of Yukon’s electrical system by about 8 per cent. It is also expected to generate about 45 gigawatt hours of hydroelectricity annually – roughly the same amount of electricity used by 3,750 Yukon homes each year. The Atlin Hydro Expansion project will be built and owned by Tlingit Homeland Energy Limited Partnership. Yukon Energy will buy the hydro power and capacity generated by the project and make it available to Yukoners. The proposed project is projected to be complete in 2024. Tlingit Homeland Energy Limited is a company 100% owned by TRTFN citizens. Yukon Energy is the primary generator and transmitter of electricity in Yukon. Contacts: Peter Kirby President & CEO Taku Group of Companies 867-689-8258 corporatetlingitpeter@gmail.com Stephanie Cunha Manager, Communications and Customer Service Yukon Energy 867-334-7760 Stephanie.Cunha@yec.yk.ca Renee Francoeur Cabinet Communications 867-334-9194 renee.francoeur@yukon.ca

Feb 22, 2021  Comment

​​​​​​​Yukon Energy announces location of the Whitehorse Battery Project

Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council to share project benefits. Yukon Energy announced today that the site on Robert Service Way near the Alaska Highway will be the future home of its grid-scale energy storage project in Whitehorse. Once complete, the 7 megawatt / 40 megawatt-hour battery will be the largest grid-connected battery in the North, and one of the largest in Canada. The final battery site is located on the overlapping Traditional Territories of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council. The site is located on Kwanlin Dün First Nation Settlement Land and on land identified by the First Nation for future development. Yukon Energy made the decision to proceed with the site near the Alaska Highway after completing a fulsome assessment that looked at each site’s technical, economic, and socio-economic attributes. A Battery Project Steering Committee with representatives from Yukon Energy, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council was formed in August, 2020. Since then, the three parties have been working together to assess location options for the battery and opportunities to maximize First Nations benefits from the project. Yukon Energy, Ta’an Kwäch’än Council and Kwanlin Dün First Nation’s development corporation, Chu Niìkwän Development Corporation, have also signed a Term Sheet outlining Yukon Energy’s commitment to provide investment, procurement, contracting and partnership opportunities to both First Nations as part of the project. The agreement provides provisions for Yukon Energy to enter into trilateral negotiations with Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council to develop Project Benefit Agreements with each First Nation with the overall objective of Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council to share available benefits to the extent possible. Each First Nation’s Project Benefit Agreement will be subject to approval by the appropriate First Nation’s government, and other government and regulatory bodies. Quotes: “Yukon Energy is firmly committed to establishing mutually-beneficial and strategic partnerships with First Nations governments and development corporations to build Yukon’s clean energy future. I would like to extend my sincerest thanks to Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Ta’an Kwäch’än Council, and to each of their representatives, for collaborating with us on the battery project. I personally look forward to continuing to working with both First Nations and their representatives in the coming years as more opportunities for green energy in Yukon come to fruition.” Andrew Hall, President and CEO, Yukon Energy “Our Development Corporation, Chu Niìkwän’s investment in this project will lead to increased opportunities for Kwanlin Dün First Nation citizens and improve access to clean stable electricity for all Yukoners. By participating in projects like this on our Traditional Territory we are realizing and activating our potential for economic development that was laid out in Chapter 22 of our Final Agreement. We wish Yukon Energy success in managing and delivering this innovative project. We see it as another step toward stabilizing Yukon’s isolated grid and reducing Yukon’s reliance on fossil fuels for back-up power generation.” Chief Doris Bill, Kwanlin Dün First Nation “Ta’an Kwäch’än Council is in full support of this project, as it will help to reduce diesel consumption and reduce Yukon’s carbon emissions. TKC looks forward to the opportunity to participate on this initiative as we are a committed partner alongside Kwanlin Dün First Nation.” Chief Kristina Kane, Ta’an Kwäch’än Council Quick Facts: The new battery is a critical investment in Yukon Energy’s ability to meet growing demands for electricity and to respond to emergency situations. As an isolated grid, one of the largest challenges Yukon Energy faces is meeting peak demands for power during winter months. The battery will store excess electricity generated during off-peak periods and provide Yukoners with access to more power during peak periods, reducing the amount of diesel needed at that time. Over the 20-year life of the project, the new battery is expected to reduce carbon emissions in Yukon by more than 20,000 tonnes. On September 5, 2019, the Government of Canada announced $16.5 million in funding for the battery through the Green Infrastructure Stream (GIS) of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. Yukon Energy’s investment in the battery is expected to be approximately $14.5 million. Three different sites were originally proposed by the Steering Committee as potential locations for the battery – two in Whitehorse near Yukon Energy’s operations on Robert Service Way and one on the North Klondike Highway.  All three potential sites were on First Nations Settlement Land and located on the overlapping Traditional Territories of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council. In December 2020, Yukon Energy announced that the site on the North Klondike Highway was eliminated from consideration after the Corporation received strong public opposition to the site. The battery is scheduled to be installed and in service by the end of 2022. Contacts: Stephanie Cunha Manager, Communications and Customer Service Yukon Energy 867-334-7760 stephanie.cunha@yec.yk.ca Leighann Chalykoff Communications Manager Kwanlin Dün First Nation 867-334-6587 leighann.chalykoff@kdfn.net Janet Smellie Communications Officer Ta’an Kwäch’än Council 867-334-5298 communicationsoffice@taan.ca

Dec 15, 2020  Comment

Yukon Energy advances grid-scale battery project in Whitehorse

Yukon Energy reached a critical milestone in its efforts to build a grid-scale battery in Whitehorse by making two major announcements about the project today. Once completed, the 7 megawatt/40 megawatt-hour battery will be the largest grid-connected battery in the North, and one of the largest in Canada. The first announcement – Yukon Energy has issued the first stage of a two-stage competitive procurement process for a battery vendor for the grid-scale energy storage project. In Stage 1, vendors are being asked to submit a proposal demonstrating their technical capability, experience and corporate capacity to deliver a battery designed to meet Yukon Energy’s operational requirements and Yukon’s northern climate. Qualified vendors chosen in Stage 1 of the process will be invited to submit a proposal in Stage 2, which will evaluate vendors based on technical specifications, price, First Nations benefits and other components. Yukon Energy’s Request for Proposals (RFP) can be viewed at yukonenergy.ca and merx.com. The RFP closes at 2:00 p.m. Yukon Standard Time on February 15, 2021. Today’s second announcement – Yukon Energy has eliminated the site beside its Takhini substation on the North Klondike Highway from consideration as a potential location for the battery. The decision to remove the site was made after nearly 60 per cent of public comments received by the Corporation about the project this past fall were in opposition to the site on the North Klondike Highway being considered as a possible location for the battery. Three different sites were originally proposed by Yukon Energy as potential locations for the battery – two in Whitehorse near Yukon Energy’s operations on Robert Service Way and one on the North Klondike Highway. All three potential sites are First Nations Settlement Land and located on the overlapping Traditional Territories of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council. Earlier this year, Yukon Energy and representatives from the Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council developed a Project Steering Committee to evaluate site options. Public feedback about the battery storage project was collected during a series of open houses in September and through discussions with property owners near each of the three proposed sites. A What We Heard Report outlining key themes and findings from those engagement sessions has been posted on Yukon Energy’s website, yukonenergy.ca. A final site for the battery is expected to be announced once lease terms have been finalized. Quote: “It feels great to reach this critical milestone,” said Andrew Hall, President & CEO of Yukon Energy. “We knew when we started this project that the most difficult and time-consuming part of it would be sourcing the right kind of battery for our unique needs and climate. Issuing this RFP now sets us up to have the battery installed and in service by the end of 2022 like we always planned.” Quick Facts: The new battery is a critical investment in Yukon Energy’s ability to meet growing demands for electricity and securing Yukon’s energy future. As an isolated grid, one of the largest challenges Yukon Energy faces is meeting peak demands for power during winter months. The battery will store excess electricity generated during off-peak periods and provide Yukoners with access to more power during peak periods, reducing the amount of diesel needed at that time. Over the 20-year life of the project, the new battery is expected to reduce carbon emissions in Yukon by more than 20,000 tonnes. On September 5, 2019, the Government of Canada announced $16.5 million in funding for the battery through the Green Infrastructure Stream (GIS) of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. Yukon Energy’s investment in the battery is expected to be between $10 and $13.5 million. The battery is scheduled to be installed and in service by the end of 2022. -30- Media contact: Stephanie Cunha Manager, Communications & Customer Service Yukon Energy 393-5333 stephanie.cunha@yec.yk.ca

Dec 11, 2020  Comment

Yukon Energy decides to prepare a proposal for the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Board to assess the Southern Lakes Enhanced Storage Project

The company will continue discussions with Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council as it prepares its proposal and will contact property owners directly affected by the project to review and finalize mitigation plans. Yukon Energy’s Board of Directors have made the decision to move the Southern Lakes Enhanced Storage Project forward, into the next stage. In doing so, the Board approved the preparation of a proposal to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board (YESAB) for a third-party evaluation of the project. While it doesn’t necessarily mean the project will proceed, the decision does mark the culmination of over 10 years of study, research, public meetings, surveys, planning, engineering and engagement. “While there continues to be mixed feelings about the project one thing is crystal clear – Yukoners want more renewable electricity,” said Andrew Hall, President & CEO of Yukon Energy. “After 10 years of researching and gathering feedback on our proposed plan, we believe we can implement the Southern Lakes Enhanced Storage Project in a way that supports Yukoners’ desire for more renewable electricity while also addressing the specific concerns of local Citizens, residents and property owners.” Yukon Energy first started assessing the Southern Lakes Enhanced Storage Project in 2009 as one way to increase the amount of renewable electricity it generates each winter. The company completed its final round of public engagement on the project in January 2020. A What We Heard Report outlining key themes and findings from the engagement sessions and two public surveys was released in May 2020. Yukon Energy plans to have its YESAA proposal ready in summer 2021. Yukoners and other interested parties will have another opportunity to share their views about the proposed project once the proposal is submitted – this time directly with YESAB.  For now, Yukon Energy will continue to engage First Nations, Citizens and residents in the Southern Lakes area to finalize key components of the project proposal including: Working with the Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än Council to complete fieldwork for a Heritage Resources Impact Assessment. Continuing discussions with First Nations governments and other stakeholders in the project area to develop a Monitoring and Adaptive Management Plan. This will help Yukon Energy track potential effects of the project and outline how the Corporation will make adjustments, if needed, to address any significant effects. Negotiating project-specific Benefits Agreements with First Nations. Meeting with Southern Lakes property owners who are expected to be directly affected by the project to review and confirm the company’s erosion and groundwater mitigation plans. Developing an adjudication process for property owners who experience unexpected impacts, should the project be implemented, to file concerns and seek additional mitigation. Should YESAB provide a positive assessment of the proposed project, Yukon Energy would subsequently authorize/permit the project with the Yukon Water Board and Fisheries and Oceans Canada in 2022. These regulatory processes also include opportunities for the public to provide feedback on the proposed plans. If all regulatory approvals are granted, the earliest Yukon Energy would be able to use the additional storage range in the Southern Lakes would be the fall of 2023. Nothing in how Yukon Energy monitors and manages water levels in the Southern Lakes will change until that time. “Soon, we’ll leave it in the hands of YESAB to make their own impartial assessment of the project,” concluded Mr. Hall. “After 10 years, we believe all Yukoners will appreciate having an independent third party involved at this stage to determine if we are right in our enthusiasm about the benefits we believe the Southern Lakes Enhanced Storage Project provides Yukon.” -30- Media Inquiries: Stephanie Cunha Communications Manager 867-393-5333 stephanie.cunha@yec.yk.ca

Nov 23, 2020  Comment

A rate increase with little impact on Yukoners’ bills

Yukon Energy Corporation is taking an innovative approach to its proposed 2021 rate increase. If supported by the Yukon Utilities Board (YUB), the rate increase could end up increasing the average Yukon residential bill by about 70 cents a month — or less than the cost of a cup of coffee. “As a regulated utility, Yukoners pay what Yukon Energy pays to plan, build, operate and maintain Yukon’s power generation and transmission assets,” said Yukon Energy President and CEO Andrew Hall. “When significant investments are needed to meet growing demands for power, electricity rates must go up to help pay for those investments.” The corporation’s General Rate Application (GRA) outlines over $55 million in investments the Corporation expects to make between 2019 and 2021. It asks for an 11.5% rate increase in 2021. This equates to 3.8% a year between 2019 and 2021. The application also outlines a way the rate increase can be implemented so that the impact on Yukoners’ monthly bills is closer to 0%. “What we’re proposing is a “nearly 0” rate increase,” said Hall. “It’s a way for us to make the investments we need to replace aging assets and meet growing demands for electricity, while providing some bill stability for Yukoners, especially those on a fixed income.” “Our Board of Directors recognizes that paying more for electricity can be hard from some Yukoners, especially during the COVID pandemic. That’s why we’ve worked hard to find a way for the rate increase to have little impact on electricity bills.” The increase comes as Yukon Energy is faced with two major challenges. First, peak demands for electricity continues to grow. Between 2018 and 2020, peak demands for electricity increased by 17%. Yukon Energy expects peak demand to rise by another 40% by 2030. Second, Yukon’s electrical system is aging and requires repairs, upgrades and replacement. Supporting future growth will require refurbished infrastructure and investments in new renewable and reliability projects. With its legacy assets, the company finds itself in circumstances similar to that of homeowners. As their families grow, their original home may require an addition. And as the house itself ages, it requires major repairs like a new roof or furnace. “Our house is over 60 years old,” said Hall, “and it needs significant work, and an addition or two.” Yukon Energy’s proposal, subject to support from YUB, is to phase in the proposed 2021 rate increase when two other charges currently on electricity bills are planned for removal next year. If all goes according to plan, the first phase will be in July and the second in December of 2021. “Our ultimate aim is to make the investments needed to support future growth with renewable and reliable sources of electricity, while minimizing the impact to Yukoners’ monthly electricity bills.” Yukon Energy submitted its rate increase proposal to the Yukon Utilities Board on November 20, 2020. Yukoners may view Yukon Energy’s rate application, and register as an intervenor or interested party at yukonutilitiesboard.yk.ca. A public information session about this rate application is being planned for early 2021. Yukoners can visit https://yukonenergy.ca/customer-service/rates/2021-rate-application/ or follow Yukon Energy on Facebook or Twitter for more details. -30- Media Contact: Stephanie Cunha Manager, Communications 867-393-5333 stephanie.cunha@yec.yk.ca

Power Outage Updates, Reliability, Safety
Oct 26, 2020  Comment

Strong Winds Causing Power Outages Across Yukon - October 26, 2020

Strong winds across Yukon are causing power outages in communities across the territory. Always assumed downed power lines are energized. If you see a downed or low-hanging power line, stay at least 10 meters back. UPDATE (3 p.m. Oct 27) Power was restored to all remaining areas affecting by yesterday's power outage at 2:40 p.m. this afternoon. Thank you for everyone's patience and support as we worked to restore power yesterday and today. With snow on the ground now and cooler temperatures on the horizon, yesterday’s wind storm is a great reminder that severe weather can cause prolonged power outages sometimes. Take some time over the next couple of weeks to build your 72-hour emergency kit. Make sure it has everything you need to take care of you and your family for 3 days. Visit the Government of Canada's website for ideas about what to include in your kit https://www.getprepared.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/yprprdnssgd/index-en.aspx UPDATE (2 P.m. oct 27): Power was restored to the remainder of customers in South Fox shortly after 1:30 this afternoon. We've also been able to energize the transmission line between Whitehorse and Carmacks. The transmission line between Carmacks and Faro will be energized in the next couple of hours after we complete some system checks at the Carmacks substation. We're sorry for the delay and thank everyone for your patience and understanding as we work to get everyone back on. UPDATE (11 a.m. Oct 27): Power was restored to customers in Mendenhall at 9:30 this morning. Crews continue to remove trees like this from the transmission line between Whitehorse and Faro. At this time, crews are optimistic that power can be restored to customers in Drury Creek, Little Fox, Little Salmon and McGundy Creek between noon and 1 p.m. today. More updates to follow as they become available. Update (6 A.M. OCT 27): Yukon Energy crews were able to restore power to an additional 30 customers in Braeburn and South Fox before midnight last night by installing a mobile diesel generator in the communities. Approximately 95 customers in Drury Creek, Little Fox, Little Salmon, McGundy Creek, parts of Mendenhall, and a pocket of South Fox are still without power. Yukon Energy crews will fly-over the transmission line between Whitehorse and Faro at first light this morning and continue with repairs. Estimated time of restoration is still mid-day today. More updates to follow as they become available. UPDATE (9 p.m. Oct 26):  High winds have caused multiple trees to land on the transmission line between Whitehorse and Carmacks, and Carmacks and Faro. With it being so dark and slick out now, crews will not be able to complete repairs to the transmission line before they hour out and must stop working. Customers in the following communities will unfortunately be without power until about mid-day Tuesday, October 27. Additional status updates will be provided in the morning. Areas affected by the power outage: Breaburn, South Fox, Little Fox, Drury Creek, McGundy Creek, Little Salmon and some parts of Mendenhall. UPDATE (7 p.m. Oct 26): Yukon Energy and ATCO Electric Yukon crews are working together to restore outages as quickly and safely as possible in communities experiencing a power outage. Your patience and understanding are appreciated.